About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN2 9
CSPAN 6
CNNW 5
KCSM (PBS) 3
CNN 2
LINKTV 2
KRCB (PBS) 1
MSNBC 1
MSNBCW 1
WHUT (Howard University Television) 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 44
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)
american human rights law is hurtin relations. >> no end in sight after nearly two years of war in syria. we will meet one man who spent the last year trying to keep his family alive. the first in a president elected -- first female president elect. for 50 years, algeria has been waiting for an apology from france. the french president addressed the parliament a few hours ago. this was how the president responded to date. >> i recognize the suffering here that colonization inflicted on the algerian people. amongst these sufferings, there was a massacre in other places o f algeria. these are in the minds of the people but also of the french people. >> following that speech for us was our correspondent who explains now why president hollande avoided a more specific apology. >> it seems as though he is taking the route of truth than apologies or using the word sorry, because that would be very difficult for french people to swallow because after all suffering. these were people whose parents, grandparents, and great grandparents were born in algeria. president hollande would have alienated
.s. and its allies potentially on the brink of entering another war in the middle east to prevent syria from doing the unthinkable. welcome to "america live," everyone, i'm megyn cel by. just days after he first reported on concerns syria was actually mixing chemical weapons that could kill thousands of people at a time, we get word that the regime has loaded the nerve agent into bombs that could be dropped, we don't know when. the president earlier this here, our president, called chemical weapons use a, quote, red line that would get an immediate response from the united states, and here's what the white house said about it moments ago. >> to the administration any more urgent than 48 hours ago? >> i think we've been clear all week about our concern -- well, probably longer than that, but since this has been a heighten, an issue that's getting heightened attention, we have made clear, i think, in very stark terms our concern about it. i wouldn't want to characterize our assessments based on intelligence any more than that. megyn: conor powell covering syria life from our mideast bureau tod
long believed syria has a huge stockpile of chemical weapons. now new concerns that chemical arsenal is on the move. secretary of state hillary clinton today issuing another stern warning against syria, using these weapons. the syrian foreign ministry quick to respond here saying it would not use chemical weapons against its people if it had any, but this announcement as turkey is sending warplanes to its border with syria after the syrian military bombed a nearby town of ras al-ain. you can hear that and see the smoke. this is the turkish side of the border. this is fueling more fears that more of syria's violence will spill into its neighbor to the north, being turkey. security concerns are prompting the u.n. to announce it is pulling nonessential personnel out of syria. want to bring in fran townsend, our cnn national security contributor and member of the cia external advisory committee. and, fran, good to see you. let's talk about these chemical weapons because we know that in the past, what, three, three have been, i guess, two, two different times the u.s. has seen syria move
about guns. and this shocking new york subway photograph. reports of chemical weapons in syria. let's get started with what promises to be a lively discussion. abbe huntsman, and a host of huff posts live. and welcome to you all. let's start with guns and the fallout of the murder and suicide of jovan bellcher and his girlfriend. bob costas of nbc spoke out about this. let's watch what he said tonight. >> i believe that there should be more comprehensive and effective controls on the sale of guns. roughly 40% of the guns purchased in this country do not require a background check for purchasing. i don't see any reason why someone should be able to purchase military style or body armor or weapons. only the police and the military should have that. >> let's start off. you've been giving me a holler on twitter about this. you are a big gun fan. explain to me why bob costas is wrong? >> it boils down to the ability to protect yourself, piers. when you look at what is what happening in syria with the threat of chemical weapons. the only reason they're not going to use it is because someb
senator mccain will be talking about syria very shortly. do either of you have any thoughts on that? >> i'm coming back >> senators talking about the passage of the russian trade bill, the vote on the floor of the senate a short while ago was 92-4. a look -- the senate continues in session with a vote coming up likely this afternoon, possible vote on the -- we had bep told there was a news conference happening on c-span. >> good afternoon, i'm here with my colleagues from the senate, senator leeber and senator graham and we are deeply disturbed by reports that assad may have weapononized some of his stores of chemical and biological agents and prepared them for use in aerial bombs. these reports suggests that assad's forces are waiting for orders. if true, these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of use of weapons of mass destruction in syria and this may be the last warning we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close and we may be left with an awful and very difficult decision. whether to continue on the said lines an
the chemical attack. it's believed according to a u.s. source that syria has put this sarin fast into cannisters that could be dropped from planes. these cannisters are designed to fracture so the devastating nerve gas could escape. but it's not known whether syria intends to use those chemical weapons. we think we have it in aerosol form. the u.s. is making contingency plans in case bashar al-asaad leaves the country suddenly and flees somewhere for asylum which would leave a vacuum there. several countries in that region are trying to find a place for assad to go. secretary of state hillary clinton has a just-added meeting today in dublin, ireland. here you see her earlier today. she and the russian minister decided to meet with the envoy to syria. across barbra himybill: russia s discussion in moscow. earlier in a week there was a report it was pulling support away from damascus. has that bent case? and why the relationship with russia so critical. >> reporter: it's one of the countries syria will listen to. russia could have sway over syrian president assad. >> the best issue
in syria. the military awaiting orders from president bashar al-assad to launch the deadly nerve gas on its own people. what is next for us and the rest of the community. the national hurricane center getting blasted for something it didn't do. we'll talk about that with janice dean. plus one man running seven ultramarathons on seven continents in seven days. why? is the big question. it's all "happening now." we'll start with news from overseas, very disturbing developments out of syria today. glad you're with us, everybody, i'm jenna lee. jon: good morning, i'm jon scott. as the violence rages out of control. fox news confirms syria's military finished mixing saran gas. they are waiting for orders from bashar al-assad. only 60 days before the gas expires and needs to be destroyed. all this comes as secretary of state hillary clinton gets ready for a rare meeting with her russian counterpart on the crisis rocking syria. that could be a sign that russia might now be ready to shift its position and support stronger u.n. action against syria. molly henneberg is live at the pentagon keeping an
on syria's civil war. he spoke along with incoming house foreign affairs committee chair ed royce on iran's nuclear program. the foundation for defense of democracies hosted this event. >> welcome. welcome again to the foundation for the defense of democracies annual washington forum. my name is mark argosh and i'm a proud supporter of fdd. it brings me great pleasure to introduce another senior official doing great work on capitol hill. congressman ed royce currently chairs the subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation and trade. last week he was selected to be the next chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. congratulations, congressman, on this new and important role. [applause] >> thanks, mark, thank you very much. >> it's no surprise that congressman royce has been entrusted by his colleagues with the committee's gavel have. he stands consistently at the forefront at the fight against global terrorist groups that threaten the united states including al qaeda. in his unusual prescience congressman royce also foreseen many of the developments we witnessed of late in the midd
-assad in syria may resort to using chemical weapons on his own people. in the meantime, the united nations is hint thag there wil hinting that there will be no asylum for bashar al-assad as the syrian dictator makes it clear that he will die before leaving the country under any circumstances. what is going on behind the scenes, for that we turn to corn powell following all the latest developments from our mideast bureau in jerusalem. connor. >> reporter: the international and internal pressure is mounting on bashar al-assad today. secretary clinton reiterated her comments that the use of chemical weapons is a red line for the united states and that there would be consequences. we are also hearing that bashar al-assad is beginning to look for asylum around the world. he is reaching out to world leaders in latin america, particularly cuba, ecuador and venezuela. not on the list of places is russia and iran his two biggest military backers. this is all coming as the internal pressure on the bashar al-assad regime seems to b to be mounting. rebel fighter are moving closer and closer to damascu
are speaking only about foreign policy and in particular in a very focused way on syria. i do want to thank those who made this possible and as chairman of the key subcommittee i value the work that you do, each of you do on a range of policies, whether it is the security of our troops in afghanistan, syria which i will focus on but also the work you do to strengthen our policy as it relates to the regime in iran. your team has brought to the forefront carefully thought out and persuasive research and policy positions that have been an outstanding resource for those of us in congress and i am grateful for that help. i know that the theme of this year's forum is, quote, dictators and dissidents:should the west choose sides? quite topical given the events that have played out most recently whether it is the arabs spring, or nascent democratic openings, i would argue the central question maybe is one of process. that question being whether the u.s. the west should support the democratic process such that citizens are able to choose their own leaders. even when the process gives rise to politic
there is troubling news on the civil war that is raging some 21 months now in syria. the international envoy trying to help end the violence there says that he's still worried there's been no progress in the ending of the bloodshed that's claimed thousands of lives. hi, everybody, i'm jaime colby, today i'm in nor jenna lee. >> reporter: i'm kelly wright in nor jon scott. the u.n. envoy meeting face to nice with the syrian president today. while their account of that meeting was lens hopeful we are hearing now even more troubling reports the syrian army may have used a deadly poisonous gas on their own citizens. leland vittert lived from bethlehem in the west bank with more details. good day to you. >> reporter: good day. it's a little bit tear lee to figure out what may or may not have happened in terms of a report of a possible chemical weapons attack. right now we are seeing no serious split along religious lines inside that country. you can see it from the latest video. an air strike on what the rebels claim was a bakery line. when you look at this video it shows a lot of armed men in camoufla
-- hillary clinton pulled a key meeting on the crisis in syria. this as concern grows over the possible use of chemical weapons. >>> the duchess of cambridge heads home after leaving a london hospital. new fallout after an embarrassing phone hoax. >>> and a contractor online. is that fair? plus anderson cooper talks being blinded by the light. >>> but we begin this morning with a look at today's "eye-opener," your world in 90 seconds. >>> this would cross a red line and those responsible would are held to kwt. >> pressure grows to stop the syrian regime. >>> credible use of weapons by syria. >> if that gas discharges it would take only one minute to kill tens of thousands of people. >> i would not put it past assad to use this weapon it's the kind of regime he's been leading. >> where are they taking you, john? >> to jail. >> john mcafee under arrest in guatemala for entering the country illegally. >> he vanished after his neighbor was found dead. >> the administration, are they prepared to go over the fiscal cliff. >> absolutely. >> fiscal cliff negotiations in washington, still up in the
upon so soon, but, you know, at the time, syria was looking, you know, as the sequential arab revolts came into being, there was very few places where the united states had an easy or even a conceivable influence -- edge to come in and do something where the consequences were not dramatic. they were at least, you know, there could be a pos five, you know, of course, egypt, a long-time ally anchor in the middle east, supportive of israel, and tunisia was a little bit, but, by that point, already crossed the threshold and ali was out, and syria, the comparisons with libya are quite, you know, very different. it's a multisectarian society with lots and lots of, you know, connections to other powers into which are iran, lebanon, israel, you know, where disrupting or changing that relationship could have all sorts of consequences which are unknown. libya presented a -- was unique that that the libyans -- there was a popular uprising, there was a program that had been put forth by a small group of people who had put themselves forward instead of on the first unofficial, then increasingly of
with a one- day strike from newspapers. the united nations is warning food shortages are growing in syria as a result of rising prices and mounting attacks on un vehicles delivering supplies. the u.n. world food program is currently feeding one, 5 million people in syria, the vast majority displaced from their homes. the news comes after the u. n announcing they are cutting back and removing staffers from damascus. among the latest victims of violence in syria, nine students and a teacher were killed when their school was bombed in damascus. government forces have blamed rebels for the attack. nato has approved a request by turkey for the deployment of patriot missiles to its border with syria. turkey sought the missiles to defend itself from cross border violence. speaking in belgium, anders fogh rasmussen says the patriot missiles would serve as a deterrent to syria. >> i do believe that a deployment of patriot missiles will serve as an effective deterrent, and that way the escalate this situation along the syrian-turkish border. the mere fact that the patriot missiles have been deploye
expelled people from the syrian embassy, part of a move to -- >> syria pass -- syria's ambassador was expelled in may. they believe the regime may soon collapse. germany has yet to recognize the opposition national coalition as the sole legitimate recognition -- representative of the syrian people. the political unrest in egypt is showing no signs of dying down. egyptian president mohamed morsi has given the military order to maintain security and protect the state institutions in the run-up to the referendum on a new constitution. the army has also been given the power of arrest. >> this comes as the country braces for more mass protests by all of it -- by opposition groups. president morsi lifted the decree expanding his presidential powers, but that has done little to calm the political unrest. and these soldiers stationed outside the political palace have new powers. >> the egyptian military now has the right to arrest civilians. another setback for the protesters camped out here day and night. president morsi has another decree -- has been told the decree giving him sweeping
of an end to the conflict. >> syria began in conflict and ends in war. day-by-day the death toll has climbed. >> that can only mean more violence, the u.n. warning that conflict has to come over -- has become sectarian. the u.n. human rights council said in its latest report that there has been a clear shift in the nature of the conflict, with more fighters and civilians on both sides describing the civil war in ethnic or religious terms. foreign fighters are filtering into syria to join the rebels, and lebanese hezbollah and ha possibly iraqi shia are supporting the government. where are foreign fighters, some with links to extremist groups, and some anti-government forces are becoming radicalized. we have met foreign fighters and they do not make up the majority of the opposition, but some work independently from the mainstream army. and some have made clear they do not recognize the syrian national council the main political body in exile and want an islamic state. fears are growing that the war may not enlist president bashar al-assad leading power. there is the possibility of reprisal k
's going on right now. syria is running out of friends. the government of assad two years deep into war with its own people never had many allies to begin with. today russia's support of syria is cracking. for the first time a senior russian official has says publicly syria could likely fall to the rebels. the deputy foreign minister in moscow said we need to look at the facts in the eye. we can't exclude a victory by the opposition. the russians have blocked all u.n. security council resolutions aimed at stopping the civil war in syria. they have vetoed sanctions against the assad regime and provided weapons to government troops fighting the rebels. now their most powerful ally says assad might be losing. they're not alone. head of nato today said this. irng the regime in damascus is approaching collapse. i think now it is only a question of time. but those people, they're the politicians, want to see the real side of syria's civil war, the streets where people are caught up in the crossfire dying there. what you're about to say you can only see here on cnn. this is a teenager risking
and israel to deal with the ongoing revolutions customer the descent into chaos and syria, the growing divide that is spreading across the arab world and the broader middle east, iran's nuclear weapons program, and the absence of an effort to resolve the israeli-palestinian conflict. these are questions and many others that we will have a chance to discuss this weekend. like me, you, i'd just can now wait to get started then that we have a very special guest tonight to get us started. i am very grateful to him for joining us tonight. we have tried for many years to have him join us at the forum. some of you misremember he was here five years ago before he became the foreign minister. since then, we have not had the pleasure for one reason or another. i am grateful that he is going to start us off today than the y today. the leader of th he is now the number two leader of the party and now the foreign minister in the current government of israel. to interview him tonight and to conduct conversations with him before we have a chance to ask him some questions, we are very grateful to robert sieg
, but his freedom comes at a terrible price. plus, syria coming apart at the seams, extremist groups playing a big role in the up rising. we will discuss how this will effect the united states and our policies there, next. [ male announcer ] red lobster's hitting the streets to tell real people about our new 15 under $15 menu. oh my goodness! oh my gosh, this looks amazing! [ male announcer ] our new maine stays! 15entrees under $15, seafood, chicken and more! oothe tilapiawith roastedegetab! i'm actually looking at the wo grilled chicken with portobello wine sauce. at pork chop was great! no more fast food friday's! we're going to go to red lobster. yep. [ male announcer ] come try our new menu and sea food differently and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. salad, sandwiches, and more. jenna: right now the civil war in syria is raging and all fronts. on the battlefield the rebels making new gains or so we hear from amateur video we are watching capturing parts of another large army base in the country's north and increasing their control of an area that is right near turkey. the fi
syria, secretary panetta said later. he said he invited kim jong-un for dinner, he served him a glass of wine and tried to find out how he thinks. he is clearly a complex man. his accomplishments over 74 years span two branches of government, education, and a little bit of farm labor on his california ranch. before taking office as the 23rd secretary of defense, secretary panetta served more than two years as cia director. after three years, chief of staff to president clinton. he and his wife cut directed the leon and sylvia and the institute at cal state university at monterey bay. to promote public service. he served eight terms in congress. rising to chairman of the house budget committee in 1989. then president clinton's director of the office of management and budget to replaced by me in welcoming to the national press club secretary defense leon panetta. [applause] >> thank you very much, theresa, for that kind introduction. thank you for the introduction to be here today. i look forward to the opportunity to go back and pick walnuts back in california. told this story before b
syria and israel. the security council decided on wednesday to extend the forces mandate by another six months. commanders have rotated units of 50 self-defense personnel through the mission since 1996. they have been responsible for transportation and logistics. japanese government officials say they will pull sdf members back next month because they are worried about safety. their mission was scheduled to wrap up in the leersd . >>> the leaders of india have agreed to work together. india's prime minister met with representatives from the ten member association of southeast asian nations. the two sides are committed to cooperation and the safety of sea lanes. >> indeed, aussian nations should negotiate for a peaceful settlement of maritime dispute in accordance with international law. >> vietnam and the phillipines, both aussian members, are in dispute with china over items in the south china sea. >>> putin has voiced his hope with government under shinzo abe. he wants to settle a long-time dispute and conclude a peace treaty. putin spoke to more than 1,200 domestic and foreign report
. another example is syria. there al qaeda in iraq seeks to establish a long-term dream. by fighting alongside the syrian opposition groups the members are working to hijack the longer struggle to suit their own extremist needs. last week we designated on the front of the ail yes, sir of aca i which is already listed as a foreign terrorist terrorist organization. as they try to wrap themselves in the legitimate sei of the we called it a warning to support the opposition to the syrian people and not help the terrorist group. to add to the list of new challenges, in west africa the loosely organized of collection of factions who have some ties to -- public sympathy. the number in sophistication to the attacks increasing and while the group focusing principally on local nigeria issues -- iranian revolutionary guard and teheran's ally hezbollah. in addition to the critical support that hezbollah are providing for serious assad regime, over the past year, there's been a significant escalation in iranian-backed terrorism. hezbollah's activity has reached an tempo unseen since the 1990s wit
you. saturday night at 10:00 p.m. eastern on c-span2 p. >>> leon panetta on the syria government response against the rebel. the remarking game at the joint briefing with the veteran affair secretary eric shinseki on efforts to assist military personnel reentering life. if no agreement is reached on the fiscal cliff. this twenty five minute event took police at the veteran affair offices in washington, d.c. >>> thank you, tommy. first, let me thank secretary panetta for the unwavering support for the here at the va and the men and women who wear and have worn the uniform of the nation. our close partnership with the immediating we had -- meeting we had today on their behalf has never been more important as it is today. as we enter the holiday season i want to thank the men and whoim spend their holiday away from the families defending the nation. we're grateful for their the service and sacrifice. as we have discussed very little what we do here at va -- most of what we work on originated in dodd and that's why achieving our priorities at va requires the close and collaborative w
developments in the growing crisis in syria. u.n. envoy calling for a transitional government run the country in order to end the conflict. russia's foreign minister mixon grimmer marks of such a plan actually working, saying that it still necessary to reach a peaceful solution. leland vittert has more on this. reporter: the russian foreign minister said that he feared that syria could turn into a bloody chaos that there was not some kind of negotiated settlement. many looking at the video that we see every day now coming out of syria. syria is already in a bloody chaos. more than 40,000 people killed. so far in this uprising. the death toll continues to rise every day. the rebels are now starting to gain momentum a little bit. pushing into damascus, some of the other larger cities. at the same time, the regime is growing more desperate and shelling of civilian areas and those kinds of things for the only lasswell might be the russians, who at some point could break away from this and getting their own traction. president bashir max as he is not leaving. the violence continues and we are at a
is a side issue. conflict in the middle east and the civil war in syria take up the headlines. he wants to change that. >> if we take down a dictatorship to establish a democracy and i do not have a plan to live on, what shall i do with democracy? -- have a planet to live on, what shall i do with democracy? >> negotiations remained deadlocked. it is hoped that a new climate treaty will come into force in 2020. no one can yet said what that will look like, but protesters are refusing to grin and bear it. >> earlier, we spoke to our correspondent. we asked whether there had been any progress at the conference. >> there is very little progress in terms of a new climate treaty, one that will bind all nations to cut their greenhouse gas emissions. there is little progress in terms of credit financing -- climate financing. there were 2.2 billion euros pledged to help with mitigation in poorer countries. today, we heard that germany followed suit and has pledged some 3.6 billion euros. for the poor countries, that is at least partly a success. bennett is europe still taking the lead and had ot
to end the civil war in syria. now, remember, both russia and china have blocked u.n. attempts to force out the assad regime. now the russians say they are willing to meet with the syrian opposition. it could open the door for real u.n. action on the ground, action that could mean american involvement. we've got more details in a live report in just a minute. >>> but also, russia's president formally saying no to americans who want to adopt russian children. it is a heartbreaking development for hundreds of americans who are trying to adopt children from russian orphana orphanages. that is happening right now. president vladimir putin signed the adoption ban today. sadly, more than 50 americans who were in the final stages of adopting russian children, they are not going to be able to. and while those families certainly hoping that they're going to allow these adoptions to go through, the country's child rights commissioner says that those kids are going to stay in russia. so why are the russians doing this? the ban is considered a payback of sorts for an american law that was passed tw
are seeing them play a more active and positive role in international diplomacy. in syria we have work to do. you see where we are headed with respect to styria based on secretary clinton's recent comments but china is strategic, china has strong interest in managing its ascension as a global power, not the only rising power in the neighborhood. it is something that we share. we believe both we, the united states, and the community of democracies have the ability to strategically put that together and do it based on the first two principles and partnerships. >> we just don't have a large advertising campaign. i just want to comment on china's syria plan. it has nothing to do with syria which is quite a separate issue. it has everything to do with wounding a america. this -- china and russia have got together and overtures were sent to delhi to send some sort of needlework if you want to use that word and india thankfully has resisted and keeps its options more nuanced and flexible. china's natural game, dr. kissinger has three chapters in his book. the interesting thing about that game is it
, and some of them in the foreign policy area are very relevant today. for instance, over syria. we understand that. we hope that at recent events, syria may be moving russia and the united states closer in terms of our thinking. but it is only a good thing to bring russia into a rules-based system with mechanisms for peaceful, transparent dispute resolution. there is no debate. and i think the chair knows this full well, that the very tragic and senseless death of anticorruption lawyer sergei magnitsky who died while in russian custody, that those events are simply unacceptable. they're appalling. and it highlights a human rights problem that has grown in its scope, not diminished. it's one we hope to be able to resolve with good relationships and good discussions. senator cardin, a sponsor of that legislation, in the house of the senate is going to speak shortly about it, and i will leave him to describe in full the nature of that particular component of this bill. suffice it to say, that human rights -- democracy and transparency activists in russia favor the passage of construct
of a mutual effort to address the threats of hezbollah patrons iran and syria. by simply designating hezbollah as a terrorist organization and stating the obvious, the europeans could deprive hezbollah to access to millions of dollars in european banks and other financial institutions while making an enormous contribution to regional stability, saving hundreds of lives that would otherwise be hezbollah's future victims. again, i strongly support this kelly resolution and i urge all of my colleagues to do the same. with that, mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from florida reserves. the gentleman from new york, mr. engel is recognized. mr. engel: i rise in strong support of h.res. 834 and yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for such time as he wishes to consume. mr. engel: thank you. this urges the members of -- the nations of europe and the european union to designate hezbollah as a terrorist organization and impose sanctions on it. we know from our experiences with iran that sanctio
of syria. the ap reporting syria has been moving around chemical components in the last week. secretary of state clinton is underscoring president obama's warning that if the syrian government uses chemical weapons, the u.s. will take action. there's no evidence they've done more at this point than move the components around and it could be a bluff but officials believe they have access to several hundred missiles that could carry chemical warheads. we're back after the break. >>now let's get some real news. (vo) first, news and analysis with a washington perspective from an emmy winning insider. >>you couldn't say it any more powerfully than that. >> current tv, on the roll. (vo)followed by humor and politics with a west coast edge. >>ah, thank you. >>it really is incredible. (vo)bill press and stephanie miller, current's morning news block. weekdays six to noon. at cepacol we've heard people are going to extremes to relieve their sore throats. oh, okay, you don't need to do that. but i don't want any more of the usual lozenges and i want new c
in the middle east if you look at syria where the u.s. is at risk for being drawn into a serious conflict there, and weapons, there's obviously talk about iran as well. is the shift occurring before the job is done? >> well, i would go back to the presidency strategy on this, and take a look at it. didn't say that we would only, we reject everything we have in the military, across our government into the asia pacific. and prioritize the asia-pacific but also talked about the enduring requirement for us to be present and any security role in the middle east as well. so, you know, we're talking about i think a near-term perspective on this. you know, we see a kaleidoscope in afghanistan. yes, the middle east has issues and has historically had issues that will require i think u.s., obviously he was leadership and also will require certain level of military security overtime. and we will have to balance that as we look at the size and nature of our force structure. and what we have, the assets we have to be able to accomplish it, but i'm convinced that we can do both in the long run. and i'm convi
is the opportunity to divert and talk about afghanistan and bahrain and syria. the agenda has remained narrow as a means of focusing the issue of our principal concern, namely proliferation. the second school of thought suggests the agenda is broader and perhaps you can have agreements on other issues that would mitigate the debt -- disagreements of the nuclear issue. as far as i can tell, that has never been resolved. when an issue remains not result, the status quo tends to prevail. given the fact that the issue of the bilateral conversation is introduced as a last-ditch effort, it is likely to remain more focused. should be considered a last- ditch effort? i don't think so. we always talk about the year of this or the year of that. we always think of it as not having enough time. yet there is always more this issue seems a degree of time flexibility. we have had bilateral discussions before. i suspect there is a bilateral conversation that it will attend the discussion. said a moment ago we need to have a sense of modesty about what we hope to achieve. i would be interested to hear what yo
the opportunity to divert and talk about afghanistan or by iran or syria. they say the agenda has to remain narrow as a means of focusing issue on our principal concern which is proliferation. the second school of thought suggests if the agenda is broader, perhaps you can have agreements on other issues that would mitigate the agreements on the nuclear issue. that particular concept has never been resolved. when an issue remains unresolved, the status quo tends to prevail. given the fact that the issue of bilateral conversation is introduced as a last-ditch effort, it is likely to remain more focused. should be considered as a last- ditch effort? i don't think so. we talk about years of decision. i think we have more time on this issue. we always think of the issue as not having enough time and being urgent but somehow there is always more time. in 2008, this issue was important and it had an urgency but it has time flexibility. we have had bilateral discussions before also in 2009. if there is a bilateral discussion [inaudible] >> marina, ray said a moment ago we need to have a sense of modesty a
at syria where u.s. is at risk, a serious conflict there with the chemical weapons, obviously, real concerns about iran as well. is the shift occurring before the job is done in the middle east? >> well, i would go back to the president's strategy on this, and take a look at it that didn't say we'd shift everything we have in the military or in the government into the asia pacific. it prioritized the asia pacific, but it talked about an enduring requirement to be in a present and security role in the middle east as well. you know, we're talking about, i think, a near term perspective on this, you know, we're -- we seed a glide slope in afghanistan. yes, the middle east is -- has issues that and has historically had issues that will require, i think, u.s., obviously, u.s. leadership, but also requires certain level of military security over time, and we will have to balance that as we look at the size and nature of our forestructure, and, you know, what we have, the assets we have to be able to accomplish it, but i'm convinced we can do both in the long run, and i'm convinced we're o
.s. and russian senior diplomats will meet today with the united nations peace envoy for syria in an attempt to end the civil war there. this comes as pentagon sources tell nbc news there is intelligence suggesting the syrian government has loaded sarin gas into aerial bombs and awaiting command from president assad for its use. >>> and from our parade of papers, "the san francisco chronicle," american jazz legend dave brubeck died just short of his 92nd birthday. he redefined american jazz in the 1950s and '60s, and he was a jazz pop star of sorts. "take five" became the first jazz recording to sell over a million copies. it made jazz popular in the united states. dave brubeck dying yesterday. >> a great musician. >> little-known fact, the guy that played stand-up bass for him the last ten years, mike allen. >> is that right? >> nobody knew that. allen. yes, he plays it and spins that thing around. >> oh, i love when he does that, slaps the back of it. >> he also, for a year and a half, when the stray cats went over to london. >> mike ailen? >> stand-up bassist for the stray cats. >> the bo
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)